It was a first round in Monday’s club. My opponent was a boy rated 1616. I got Black, he played Scotch gambit. I decided to play the main line with 4… Nf6. I knew that line a bit, though played it OTB just one, max two times.

After his 14. f4 I decided to play f5 to stop his pawn attack on the kingside. He looked surprised and spent some time trying to find a plan. Then I completely missed that after his Na4 he controls c5 and really didn’t like it. I considered Bb5, but thought that bishop will be vulnerable there. So I played g5 to spice the things up. Here I missed 21… d4 strike. After 22. Nxd4 Bxd4 23. Bxd4 c5 24.  Nxc5 Nxc5 White has to play h3 to prevent the devastating consequences of Bb7+. On move 23 I considered d4 with the idea of cutting off the piece on c5, calculated it, but my calculation was wrong and I didn’t play it, same on move 24.

As a result I got worse. White missed 28. a5 and if Bxa5 then Qf2-Qe3-e5 with the horrific attack. When I decided that I am out of the trouble he played 32. Qe3. I noticed the Qe3-e5 threat and thought that the only defense from the mate would be to exchange on c5, then taking on e6. I saw that I was losing then two pawns – “a7” and “c7”, but thought that opposite-colored bishops would give me a draw. Instead of it the cool 32… a6! 33. Qe5 Kg6! was leading to an equal position.

In the endgame my plan starting from 38… Kd7 was wrong. I think I would be better off keeping my king on the kingside with the bishop stopping the “a” pawn. My 40… h5 was a serious mistake, then my position deteriorated and I lost.

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